How to Approach Your Weekend Mindfully

It’s no secret around here that I am big on mindfulness and intentionality. Yes, approaching what we do with thoughtfulness and purpose typically takes some extra time and energy, but in the end, it makes a huge difference in the quality of our lives.

 

One area where this mindfulness and intentionality are important? Weekends. I know, I know; that doesn’t sound fun, spontaneous, or carefree, but hear me out.  Most of us spend our weeks working really hard. Whether we’re at the office, taking care of family, carting kids to practice, or hunched over bills and books, we are managing a lot. The demands are great, resources run low, and by Friday, most of us feel pretty spent. We often depend on weekends to provide some sort of antidote to the craziness of the week.

 

 

Yet, how often do most of us stop and think about what we need for the weekend? How often do we take stock of what our week was like, what we’re feeling, and what we need? If our weekends are going to be our time to refuel, we have to make time to assess how we’re feeling and what we need.

 

Do you feel drained and depleted? Maybe you need rest and relaxation.

 

Do you feel disconnected or isolated? Perhaps you need to be social, spending time with friends or family.

 

Do you feel overwhelmed and behind on projects? Maybe you need to spend some time catching up or being productive?

 

Do you feel sluggish or cooped up? Perhaps getting outside or being active is what you need.

 

By taking the time to check in with ourselves, we can better know what we need and how to make that a priority over our weekend. Otherwise, Friday night quickly turns into Sunday evening, and before we realize it, we’ve spent our weekend in a way that wasn’t particularly mindful or congruent with what we needed.

 

As we move toward the weekend, stop to check in with yourself. What are you noticing about your experience, how do you feel, what do you need? Take time to be mindful and assess your experience so that your weekend can be a true and meaningful refuel.

 

PS: Want more info on mindful check-ins? See this post.

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